Just a few random blu stories…

  • A week after I brought blu home, she went to stay with a friend.  I still had no clue how blu dealt with people in general, kids, and other pets.  The first few days of the holiday week, my boss went to work leaving blu with a neighbor & her three young daughters during the day.  Apparently blu LOVED kids.  Loved them.  So much, that I felt bad I didn’t have any.  On the second day, as my friend walked blu back to her house, she realized blu had a stuffed grinch (who stole Christmas) in her mouth.  blu stole the grinch from the little girls – but it also became her favorite toy.  Until she destroyed it.  People – check.  Kids – check.  Other pets – check.

  •  blu, who I decided (after much discussion with others) was really an Alaskan Malamute, greeted people she had met with a big WOO WOO howl.  We would cross paths with other people on our walks and they always wanted to meet her (because she was gorgeous).  The next time we would run into them, she would let out this big WOO WOO as if she was saying “hello friend.  It’s nice to see you again.”  I only got the WOO WOO when I did not do what she wanted.
    d
     
  • My boss became blu’s dog sitter when I was out of town for volleyball tournaments.  Her husband was not a huge fan of pets in general.  But, blu who loved men like crazy, turned him.  She would wake him up in the morning with her woo woo’s and every time we went to visit, they would do their little dance.  blu had that way with people.
    d
     
  • One of my volleyball players gave blu a stuffed polar bear for Christmas my last season in Charlotte.  This became her favorite toy.  It took exactly one year for her to destroy it.  She would eat the stuffing out of the nose but then would let the bear live for exactly one year.  She carried the bear everywhere.  She would carry it from room to room; wherever blu was, the bear followed.  Her buddy Sue gave her a new bear each year – even after we moved to Seattle.  The same pattern: eat the nose, carry it around with her, a year later, all the stuffing was removed.  When it was time to go for a walk, the bear was dropped at the front door – as if she wanted it to be the first thing she would see coming home.

 

  • I had switched to the gentle leader (not the nose one – the under/around the chest leader).  While playing with a neighbor dog on our nightly walk, she got out of it and ran off.  My neighbor went to get her car to track her down and I took her dog and stormed after blu.  Walking along Johnston Road, I watched as she tried to walk across the street but eventually made it back to  my side of the street.  I followed her for the two miles it took to reach the South Carolina border.  At one point, she ran into someone’s garage but she was a large dog and they were more scared to grab her then listen to me.  She ran down a dark two lane country road.  I believed it was going to be the last time I saw her.  Cars were flying down the road.  There were no street lights.  I sat on the curb with the other dog & cried.  Miraculously, she came back but I couldn’t get a hold on her and she dashed off again.  I walked back home.  I drove around a few hours that night: no dog.  I drove everywhere the next morning: no dog.  I was in the process of making signs when I received a phone call from a vet saying they had my dog.  Apparently, she had started to follow me home because she was found somewhere between where I left her & my house.  She curled up in someone’s backyard.  The next morning she was still there and the kind stranger brought her to the vet to see if she had been microchipped.  (PLEASE MICROCHIP YOUR ANIMALS!!  It costs about $10 & totally worth it.)  After that, the gentle leader was stashed away & her punishment was to walk with a backpack or a choke chain at all times.
    d

  •  People get annoying when you spend too many consecutive hours with them.  Also true of dogs.  Whoda thunk?  Driving cross country together, she hardly slept.  Driving through Tennessee, it became a game to see if she would lay down longer than the last time.  The first day, she wouldn’t sleep more than 5 minutes at one time.  As we made our way through Oklahoma and Colorado, she was laying down longer.  In Denver, we stayed in a nice hotel: I felt a bit like a celebrity, walking through the lobby with this furry beast and riding the elevator to our room.  Usually, you see small dogs, but here was this massive white dog who was sometimes mistaken for a wolf.  By the fourth day, driving through Idaho and into Oregon, I could not handle the incessant breathing in my ear.  There were many words – mostly “why can’t you just sleep like a normal dog?”
     d 
  • My nephew T was about two when he met blu and they immediately became best friends.  He loved to rub ears & blu had the softest ears.  While my nieces were clamming, T ran up and down the beach with blu.  For Christmas, she gave him stuffed polar bears.  (She finally had her kid!)  After she died, I gave him the new polar bear Sue sent for blu.  He still sleeps with them.
    d

A big WOO WOO to all blu’s friends.  There were a lot of you!

Advertisements